Stephanie Perkins Blog About Stephanie Books On Writing News Extras



9.10.2011

Tomorrow



Every year on the anniversary of 9/11, I read Meg Cabot's post about that day. Please take the time to read it this weekend.

Thinking of my family, friends, and readers in New York City and D.C.

xoxo


P.S. I was in Atlanta, opening the B. Dalton bookstore that I managed, when a coworker arrived and told me to turn on the radio. Where were you?

EDITED TO ADD: Maureen Johnson just posted a good one, too.

28 comments:

  1. I was probably sitting on a blanket playing with a toy, or annoying my mom. You know. I was FOUR. Lol. XD

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  2. I was watching Good Morning America in Cincinnati, Ohio, so I saw the news coverage from the beginning. Sitting on my bed folding laundry. My two year old was running around the room "helping" me.

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  3. I was in Kindergarten that year, and teachers and adults always assume that kids my age can't remember it first hand, but I remember it vividly. I remember coming home from the Kindergarten, where I was in the morning session, and my dad was home. He works in Boston, so it was weird for him to be home so early. He was watching the TV in shock so I turn to see what he's looking at, and there's footage of the plane crashing into the second tower on my TV. And I did get it, I understood that these bad guys were trying to hurt innocent people.

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  4. I was in fifth grade, and all I remember from that morning was coming in from recess to see my teacher and student-teacher watching the television and looking worried. But then they didn't tell us ANYTHING, so I forgot about it until I got home later and my mom told my sister and me what had happened...

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  5. I was at work, fixing email problems. Then the bossman walked over to our cubicle cluster and said that a plane had crashed into the WTC. From that point on, everyone spent the next few hours frantically refreshing their browsers dialed into CNN.

    Went home just after lunch, and drove home under a sky bereft of plane contrails. You don't know how weird it is not to see any until you don't. The world stood still for a while, I swear.

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  6. At home in Gilbert Arizona getting ready to leave for work. The drive to Tempe was so quiet no loud music, no honking or yelling never before and never again have I felt connected to the strangers surrounding me.

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  7. I was at college--in the main lobby, where I was an RA--and heard about it first on the radio.

    It was...such a scary time. It was a time full of unknowns. I will never forget it.

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  8. I was in second grade. I don't remember anything except the school district wide announcement for all TVs to be turned off immediately after the second tower was hit, and the conversation I had on the way home from school with my mom when she explained to me what had happened: "Bad people made the towers fall, people were hurt."

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  9. I was asleep (because of the time difference) but my mum woke me up early the next day, yelling that "America was being attacked!" It's one of those things that I know will always stay with me.

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  10. I worked Third shift at the time and I woke up that afternoon and went into the living room and my roomate was sitting there with tears in her eyes watching tv. I looked at the TV and saw the clip of the secound plane hitting the building and it was just so sureal, at first it seemed like a movie. I asked my roomate what happened and she told me and I just went numb. I had to go to my secound job shortly after which was at Radio shack in the mall. The news was on all the display TV'S. It just showed those scenes over and over and at this point there was still no clear understanding of what happened or if anything else might happen. So after being at work for about an hour we were all sent home because the mall was closeing early.When I went to bed that morning it was such a beutiful day and when I woke up the world had changed forever. I'll never forget it.

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  11. I love Meg's post. And I'm going to re-read David Levithan's Love is the Higher Law, which is incredible.

    I was in grade five, my mom used to wake me up by turning the radio on, and that was the story that was flooding the radio. Very shocking. I'll always remember my mom's gasp.

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  12. Thank you for sharing the link to Meg's post. I hadn't read it before, but I'm glad I was able to today.

    I was in middle school, and a friend ran up to me before first period and said "New York's blown up!" in a weirdly excited way. I didn't know what she was talking about, but in my first class, my teacher took a long time to get started, watching the tiny T.V. in the classroom. I think the school made all the teachers stop listing/watching to footage, though, because I didn't fully understand until I got home that day.

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  13. I just noticed that I forgot to spell check my comment.Please pardon my lousy spelling/typing skills. :/ *embarrassed*

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  14. I was only in the first grade, but I still remeber the day vividly. At school, almost everyone in my class was being checked out early. At the end of the day, me and this other boy where the only one's left in my class. My teacher's eyes were all red and puffy after lunch and we just did centers for the rest of the day. When I got on the bus that afternoon, my brother (who was in fifth grade) made me come sit with him in the back, which was weird because this was the stage of our lives in which we hated each other. When I asked him what was going on, he said that he would just let Mom explain. I later found out the he had watched the news in his class. Our mom was waiting for us at the bus stop, which she never did. There was a middle eastern boy who lived in my neighborhood and his mom was at the bus stop too, but she wouldn't get out of her car. My mom told me the jist of what had happened when we got home: some bad men had crashed planes into some very special and important buildings and a lot of people were dead. They tried to keep me from seeing the news that night; I had an overactive imagination and so was very easily frightened. I'll never forget the first time I saw that famous shot of the Twin Towers, with that giant hole and all that smoke. I couldn't sleep that night because I was sure that those bad men would come crash a plane into my house. It was easily the scariest day of my life.

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  15. I was in Alabama in my sophomore French class when another teacher came in and spoke to our teacher for a moment. He turned on the television and we watched the news coverage the rest of the day throughout all of our classes. The realization of it all didn't hit me until much later.

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  16. Thank you for sharing Meg's post.

    I was thirteen, in the eighth grade, and my mom woke me up soon after the second tower was hit. I thought it was way too early for me to be up - we're on the west coast - but her voice was frantic, so I got up to see what was going on. It was terrifying. At the time we lived right under a flight path for LAX. We were used to planes flying low, shaking the house, how loud the planes could sound... It was very odd to have their silence once the planes were grounded.

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  17. Thanks for posting the link to Meg's post. You're right, it is good to remember. Her post put it into a new perspective for me.

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  18. Elizabeth9:19 PM GMT-5

    I was in my seventh grade science class. My teacher came in at the start and told us what happened. It was too confusing though, at least the way she told it. It just didn't seem like that big of a deal.

    But later, at lunch, we found out that the Pentagon had been hit and that's when we realized how bad it was. I live about 30 minutes from D.C...a lot of the kids in my school had parents who worked in and around the city--my mom drove past the pentagon every day on the way to work. Some girls were crying and soon we all got pulled out of class one by one.

    When I finally got to my babysitter's house, I actually saw what happened. No one said a word while we watched the news. My mom picked me up soon after and the radio was off...I remember the day was so beautiful but so silent. The only thing my mom said on the ride home was that she was too angry, too upset.

    That night I found out my mom was driving past the Pentagon when it was hit. My babysitter's neighbor was in it. Fortunately, they were both all right but I will always remember how close we were to it all.

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  19. I was in first grade. I think our (incredibly young) student teacher got a phone call, but she turned on the TV and we watched the second plane hit the towers. First graders. I think once our teacher realized what was going on, she turned off the TV. That's all I clearly remember, but I know that the PE teachers went around and changed that day to inside PE instead of outside, and that everyone was TERRIFIED because we live near to a pretty major base. But I'll always remember the look on the student teacher's face. Always.

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  20. I was a teacher in a rural Oklahoma junior/senior high. My planning period was second hour. I walked to the office where the secretary told me something had happened. I went to the library to find it already full of teachers and students, their eyes glued to the TV. My dad was also a teacher there at the time. It only took a moment for me to realize the seriousness of it all. I glanced over at my dad. I really wanted to curl up next to him, but knew I needed to be a grown up, a source of strength for the students. I took my place next to a coworker instead, and tried to get a grip.

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  21. I was a Junior in high school in Oklahoma, and watched the news footage in my first hour English Class. It was extremely surreal to watch what was going on, my heart was sick for all those who were suffering.

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  22. I was in Waco, TX at my Mimi's house. I was 9 years old. We had to go to her gift shop to re-arrange and all of the shop girls had the TV's and radios on listening about it. I couldn't handle it so I had my Sister's Walkman turned all the way up. It still wasn't enough so my uncle had to take me back to my Grandma's house. Only TCM and Cartoon Network were playing regularly scheduled things. Every other channel was covering the attacks. I switched between the two for the rest of the afternoon until we went home.

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  23. I was in LA, in my first month at USC. My alarm was set to radio, so I woke up to the report, and thought it had to be a joke. Until I turned on my TV...

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  24. I was in kindergarten and i remember my mom comming to pick me up when the first tower was hit. We made it home in time for us to see the second plane go into the second tower. I understood that it was unusual for this to happen and i remember my mom crying when my dad came home from work that day. He was supposed to be in a meeting at the world trade center and it was cancelled. he wanted to surprise my mom by comming home and when he heard what happened, he couldn't call her. She thought he was dead. I remember that day so clearly and my age group is probably the last that will be able to remember

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  25. I was 11 years old, at home(I was homeschooled), with my mom & sister. My dad called from work and told my mom to turn on the tv. We watched from before the second plane hit for a long time after. The images of that day will live with me forever, and I cannot imagine having been there that day.

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  26. I lived in Queens, NY.

    Let out of Social Studies class. Some kids in my school got escorted because their parents worked downtown. At my house we were freaked because my aunt worked across the street from there. She walked all the way uptown and across the bridge to get back to Queens.

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  27. I was fourteen. We had just moved from Washington to Wisconsin, so not only was it my second week of high school, but my second week of high school in a new town. I was in first period choir, and while I don't remember who told us to turn on the television, I remember my choir director turning it on and crying. We turned on the tv moments before the second plane hit. I immediately started sobbing in my chair. My dad was still in the Navy at the time, and all I could think was "This will mean war. And I don't want my dad to go." I'm embarrassed at how selfish I was, but I was terrified that my dad, who had already been involved in Desert Storm, would have to face this new crisis. Fortunately, he didn't, but I'm so so thankful for the men and women who did. Never forget.

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  28. Thank you for sharing both of these, Stephanie. I was working for 12 hours yesterday, so I missed most of the memorial coverage. But as a current New Yorker, I appreciate you posting this. Both Maureen and Meg's blog's made me cry. I can't imagine what it must have been like in NYC on that day. I still don't even like to go downtown near the WTC site, because it makes me too sad.

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